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Yoga Props & Accessories: Tingsha / Hand Cymbals for meditation

US$27.23
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Tingsha / Hand Cymbals …………………………………………………………………... The silvery, soothing, rich sound of Tingsha instantly strike an echo within the heart. Their purpose is to summon, therefore Tingsha call us to awareness, to remember who we are, and to recognise our priorities in the world. The Tingsha draw their name from the Tibetan syllables "ting" (ringing sound of metal) and "sha" (hanging), and their meaning can be translated as "hanging cymbals". How Tingsha are made The Tingsha are individually handcrafted by the ancient Tibetan method of sand-casting, where an upper and lower mould are made from fine wet sand which is then baked several times over a charcoal fire. When the moulds are ready, the molten bell metal is poured. After casting, each individual Tingsha is skillfully tuned by hammering around the thick outer rim to create a perfectly matching pitch for each pair. The bell metal used in the Tingsha is made of a pure bronze alloy of copper and tin , with a white metal component of zinc and nickel. How to play the Tingsha There are three main techniques for striking the Tingsha to create a sustained sound. The leather thong is hold between fingers and thumb just above the centre of each cymbal. - Suspend the Tingsha horizontally, a few inches apart, then draw them together so that their edges strike. - Suspend one Tingsha horizontally while holding the downward-striking Tingsha vertically in the opposite hand. - Hold both Tingsha vertically, at right angles, and strike edges together with a simultaneous movement of both hands. As hanging chimes, the Tingsha may be suspended by their leather thong from two hooks and struck with a wooden striker. The paired Tingsha may also be separated to create two individual cymbals, with a striker attached to each end of the divided leather thong. Tingsha Uses Traditionally, Tingsha are used in guidance prayers and food offerings for the dead; in burned foods and water offerings for the "hungry ghosts" or tormented spirits; in burned food offerings for the "four classes of guests". These rituals are performed by Tibetan monks, and they can be repeated daily, or as a cycle of a hundred thousand offerings. Used in meditation, when Tingsha (cymbals) strike each other they produce a clear, pure sound. This indicates the beginning and the end - at the beginning you let go of everything except the clean moment of here and now; at the end you awaken physically and spiritually in the here and now of material reality. We have a good selection of Tingsha. As choosing cymbals is down to personal preference, we have included sound files with each tingshas. …………………………………………………………………... "Lotus Tingsha bells / hand cymbals" These Lotus Tingsha bells (hand cymbals) are engraved with one of the best known and most often used mantras of Avalokiteshvara, the Buddha of Compassion, 'om mani padre hum'. The mantra is translated as 'Hail of the Jewel in the Heart of the Lotus' and its sound is supposed to ring throughout the universe, telling of the victorious power of freedom that is to save all beings. The syllable 'om' stands for the body, spirit and speech of the Buddha, 'mani' for the path of teaching, 'padme' for the wisdom of the path, and 'hum' points to the union of wisdom and the path to it. The undersides of the Tingsha are inscribed in each of the four cardinal directions with the three sacred Tibetan syllables Om A Hum. The three syllables are engraved in an anticlockwise sequence, and they represent the three aspects of enlightened body (Om), speech (A) and mind (Hum). These correspond to the spiritual concept of purity in deed (body), word (speech) and thought (mind). The syllables also represent the three 'divine bodies of a Buddha': - The physical 'form or emanation body' - The visionary 'enjoyment body' - The pure empty 'truth or djharma body'. These divine bodies correspond to the three 'intermediary states' of the death experience and to the three 'everyday states' of waking, dream and deep sleep. The Tingsha are approx 3” in diameter and they produce a lovely, clear sound. …………………………………………………………………... Astamangalas Tingsha bells / hand cymbals The inscription on these Astamangala Tingsha bells (hand cymbals) shows the 8 Symbols of Happiness, also known as the Auspicious Symbols. - A white parasol - A golden treasure vase - A pair of golden fishes - A lotus - A victory banner - A white conch shell that spirals towards the right - An endless knot or 'lucky diagram' - A golden wheel In the Buddhist tradition, the eight Auspicious symbols represent the offerings presented to Shakyamuni Buddha upon his attainment of enlightenment. They symbolise the 'Eightfold Noble Path' that leads to the cessation of sufferings and enlightenment. This path consist of: - Correct view or understanding - Correct thought or analysis - Correct speech - Correct action - Correct livelihood - Correct effort - Correct mindfulness - Correct concentration or meditative stability In Sanskrit, these symbols are known as Ashtamangala, and in Tibetan as the Tashi-targey. In the Indian Buddhist tradition they were later deified into a group of eight offering goddesses, known as Astamangala Devi, each of whom carried one of the auspicious symbols as an attribute. The Tingsha are approx 3” in diameter and they produce a lovely, clear sound. …………………………………………………………………... Dragon Tingsha bells/ hand cymbals These Tingsha bells (hand cymbals) are decorated with etched dragons. The dragon embodies strength, goodness and the spirit of change or transformation Good to use when masculine (yang) energy is required for clearing and balancing. The undersides of the Tingsha are inscribed in each of the four cardinal directions with the three sacred Tibetan syllables Om A Hum. The three syllables are engraved in an anticlockwise sequence, and they represent the three aspects of enlightened body (Om), speech (A) and mind (Hum). These correspond to the spiritual concept of purity in deed (body), word (speech) and thought (mind). The syllables also represent the three 'divine bodies of a Buddha': - The physical 'form or emanation body' - The visionary 'enjoyment body' - The pure empty 'truth or djharma body'. These divine bodies correspond to the three 'intermediary states' of the death experience and to the three 'everyday states' of waking, dream and deep sleep. The Tingsha are approx 3” in diameter and they produce a lovely, clear sound. …………………………………………………………………... 6 Symbols Tingsha bells / hand cymbals These Lotus Tingsha bells (hand cymbals) are engraved with six mantra symbols. The syllable 'om' stands for the body, spirit and speech of the Buddha, 'mani' for the path of teaching, 'padme' for the wisdom of the path, and 'hum' points to the union of wisdom and the path to it. The undersides of the Tingsha are inscribed in each of the four cardinal directions with the three sacred Tibetan syllables Om A Hum. The three syllables are engraved in an anticlockwise sequence, and they represent the three aspects of enlightened body (Om), speech (A) and mind (Hum). These correspond to the spiritual concept of purity in deed (body), word (speech) and thought (mind). The syllables also represent the three 'divine bodies of a Buddha': - The physical 'form or emanation body' - The visionary 'enjoyment body' - The pure empty 'truth or djharma body'. These divine bodies correspond to the three 'intermediary states' of the death experience and to the three 'everyday states' of waking, dream and deep sleep. The Tingsha are approx 3” in diameter and they produce a lovely, clear sound. …………………………………………………………………... Plain Faced Tingsha bells / hand cymbals These plain faced Tingsha bells have the purest tone and longest sustain of any of the Tingsha available. They have the look, weight and feel of the antique Tingsha. Unbelievable sound quality! The Tingsha are approx 3” in diameter and they produce a lovely, clear sound

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Height 7
Width 7
Length 3

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